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Breaking the Silence Provides A Open Discussion To Address Workplace Harassment

Women comprise 70% of the U.S. hospitality workforce and as many as 90% of female restaurant employees report some form of sexual harassment. Late last year, the nonprofit, One Fair Wage, Issued a report which based on surveying 1,675 restaurant service workers. 41% said they had experienced more harassment since the start of the pandemic.

Offering actionable solutions, Les Dames d’Escoffier New York (LDNY) recently united hospitality leaders and advocates to present helpful information and resources through a free live webinar “Breaking the Silence: Confronting Harassment in the Hospitality Industry,” sponsored by the Institute of Culinary Education.

“Our organization is against the normalization of such unconscionable behavior and we are determined to offer supportive solutions,” said LDNY Co-President Jen O’Flanagan of FeastPR. Her LDNY Co-President Jenifer Lang, the former Managing Director of Café des Artistes, added “Harassment is insidious and needs to be attacked from every angle. Our goal is to empower the victims to defend themselves: legally, physically, and professionally.”

The Connected Table Live Host Melanie Young, an LDNY member and chapter past-president, assembled a panel of six industry experts in human resources, labor relations law, wage discrimination, self-defense and behavioral therapy for an in-depth conversation.

Melanie Young, Webinar Moderator, Co-Host of The Connected Table Live and SIPS

“The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) reported that more than 14% of sexual harassment charges came from the food and hospitality Industries. In 2019 employers paid out a record $68.2 million to employees alleging sexual harassment. When selecting panelists, I wanted a diverse group of experts to provide solutions, support and best practices to help both workers and employers.” said Young.

This summit of female hospitality leaders identified several key steps to address this pervasive problem:

Legalize Fair Wages

Research by One Fair Wage, a national coalition, campaign and organization focused on the service sector, found the restaurant industry to be one of the largest and fastest growing industries, yet it has the absolute lowest wages of any industry in the United States, with 43 states paying only $2.13 an hour. “Female workers are overwhelmingly dependent on the whims and biases of customers and whether customers are pleased with their service,” stated Saru Jayaraman, president of One Fair Wage. “’Pleased with their service’ has translated to physical and behavioral biases, core issues that enable sexual harassment. This became even clearer and more blatant during the pandemic.”

Saru Jayaraman
Saru Jayaraman, President, One Fair Wage

Conversely, according to Jayaraman, the seven states that honor a full minimum wage in the hospitality sector (California Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Minnesota, Montana, and Alaska) have one half the rate of sexual harassment claims and better business with higher restaurant industry sales, higher job growth, and higher rates of tipping. “We have accepted and normalized the sexual harassment in this industry, which cannot continue. We need everybody to help push for elimination of the subminimum wage,” said Jayaraman.

Create Transparent, Supportive Culture

Theodora Lee, shareholder of Littler Mendelson P.C., labor law specialists, and owner of Theopolis Vineyards, advocated for every employee within the workplace to be made familiar with agencies such as the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and their local branch of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (USCCR), where they can file a sexual harassment complaint without the need to hire a lawyer. “Because of long tradition, employees don’t know they can take action. There are laws on the books,” says Lee.

Theodora Lee, Shareholder, Littler Mendelson P.C.,
Labor Law Expert Theodora Lee, Shareholder, Littler Mendelson P.C.

Only 10% of sexual harassment is reported, which “exposes this overall resistance that people have, this fear that prevents them from reporting,” said Taryn Abrahams, MFT, SHRM-CP Founder/CEO, Empower Behavioral Services, LLC. She encouraged companies to create a transparent culture with clear decision-making and bold communications that includes scripts and training to intervene, if they choose to.

Taryn Abrahams, MFT, SHRM-CP Founder/CEO, Empower Behavioral Services, LLC
Taryn Abrahams, MFT, SHRM-CP Founder/CEO, Empower Behavioral Services, LLC

Ashley Oberdorff, PHR, Director, Empowered Hospitality, emphasized the importance of all restaurants—large corporations or “mom-and-pop”—having a human resources department, either in house or outsourced. She also explained how critical it is to ensure that policies are up to date and to address sexual harassment in employee handbooks, with an acknowledgement form for employees. “It’s so important to act and not put it off,” recommends Oberdorff. “Make sure everything is documented. Find out the facts and go from there.”

Ashley Oberdorff
Ashley Oberdorff, PHR, Director, Empowered Hospitality

Better Workplace Training

“There is a real need to create better, more effective training around this topic. The missing piece is the importance of arming people with the skills to be able to intervene if they choose to,” said Abrahams.

“In hospitality, people by nature have great relational skills, can read someone’s face or body language and tell whether or not someone is happy with their meal. We build on those same skills to give people the skills and practice they need to be more comfortable intervening [in harassment],” said Lauren R. Taylor, director, Safe Bars and Defend Yourself. The Safe Bars program recently formalized training for people who work in bars and restaurants to quickly identify sexual harassment and safely prevent it through strategies like bystander intervention.

Lauren Taylor
Lauren R. Taylor, director, Safe Bars and Defend Yourself

Effective bystander invention training includes different tools to address sexual harassment based on an individual’s comfort level. “It creates awareness and a sense of collective responsibility, because the reality is that most victims don’t speak up. It also gives victims a sense of empowerment,” said Abrahams.

Step Up as a Mentor

The webinar’s title, “Breaking the Silence,” was inspired by panelist, Alpana Singh‘s blog post, “The True Cost of Silence.” In it. Singh shares an emotional coming to terms for remaining silent over the years as she and other female members of the Court of Sommeliers experience harassment by its male members.

Alpana Singh, Sommelier. Restaurateur, Television Host

“To me, from walking away from that title [Court of Master Sommelier], I can speak for those who can’t speak. You don’t have to take it; let me take it for you so you don’t have to. I couldn’t do that 15 years ago, but I can now,” noted Singh, sommelier, restaurateur, host of the Emmy-Award winning PBS-TV Show, Check, Please! Professional organizations such as Les Dames d’Escoffier New York and social media groups such as Women in Hospitality are also forums for resource references, support and solidarity. “The moral arc of the universe is long but bends toward justice–you don’t want to be caught in a situation where you could have done something, and you did nothing.”

A replay of the Breaking the Silence webinar can be watched on YouTube.com. Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2qOYa1Z9Qk&t=21s 

For additional resources on this topic and information on speakers and the webinar Gold Sponsor, Institute of Culinary Education, visit www.ldny.org

LDNY logo

About Les Dames d’Escoffier

Les Dames d’Escoffier New York (LDNY) is an unparalleled collective of forward-thinking and successful female leaders in all sectors of the food, beverage and hospitality industries. Located in the most dynamic and competitive city in the world, Les Dames d’Escoffier New York (LDNY) is the founding and largest chapter of Les Dames d’Escoffier International (LDEI), an experienced 501c3 non-profit organization. Our mission is to advance and support aspiring professional women in food and beverage, as well as to champion critical industry issues. LDNY’s vision is guided by three objectives: Education, Advocacy and Philanthropy.

Want to hear more? Listen to our conversations on this topic and more with panelists Saru Jayaraman, One Fair Wage, and Sommelier/Restaurateur Alpana Singh on The Connected Table LIVE.

 

 

 

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Sipping Alsace Wines with Famille Cattin

Considered one of the world’s great wine regions, France’s Alsace has long been a player on the international stage with its exceptional still and sparkling wines. With 12 generations at the helm, the Cattin family has been at the center of this region’s wine production since 1720.

Cattin family

France, you say, has many wine regions, so what sets Alsace apart? While France does boast a large number of regions devoted to making wine, most are warm climate areas where red wines dominate. Alsace, with its moderate climate and northerly geographic position next to Germany, is known for its production of white wines, and so holds a special place in the often-complicated world of French winemaking. Let’s take a closer look.

Jacques & Anais Cattin
Jacques and Anaïs Sirop Cattin

Domaine Joseph Cattin (www.cattin.fr) is the largest independent family-owned winery in Alsace and is located in the small village of Voegtlinshoffen, just South of Colmar. Now run by husband-wife family members, Jacques and Anaïs Sirop Cattin, the winery makes wines across the full spectrum of what Alsace offers, with particular emphasis on Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Pinot Blanc, and their self-professed specialty, Crémant d’Alsace sparkling wine – all of which are widely available in the U.S.

Cattin's Hatschbourg vineyard
Cattin’s Hatschbourg vineyard dates back to 1188. Throughout the centuries vineyards were planted by Augustinian monks, bishops and even a Hungarian Queen. Today it cultivates Alsace’s four “noble grape varieties” – Riesling, Muscat, Pinot Gris and Gewurztraminer. Vines are planted on slopes, with an altitude varying from 200 to 330 m. In the heavy, deep and well-drained soils composed of marl, clay and limestone. (reference www.cattin.fr)

The family currently owns just over 160 acres of vines throughout the area, and like a majority of Alsace producers, farms their vineyards organically. “We’ve been farming this land for 12 generations,” said Anaïs Cattin, “by farming our vineyards sustainably, we have a better chance to ensure this winery will produce for the next twelve generations.” Cattin’s wines, all certified vegan, by the way, are produced in two separate wineries, one for still wines , the other dedicated exclusively to the production of Crémant d’Alsace.

Joseph Cattin
Winery namesake Joseph Cattin was a viticulturalist whose expertise in grafting rootstock played an important role in saving Alsace vineyards from phylloxera in the 19th century.

Cattin’s whites are textbook Alsace wines, with each expression showing true varietal character whether made as AOC classified wine or coming from specific “Cru d’Alsace” vineyards – those next level properties showing unique terroir that are designated as the best vineyards in Alsace. A hallmark of Alsace wines is their beautiful compatibility with food. “While they can be consumed anytime, these are food wines,’ said Jacques Cattin, “their weight, acidity, and depth of flavor all condone pairing with not just the local cuisine of Alsace, like our famous choucroute, but with a variety of other foods, including cheeses, meats, and even fish.”

Crémant d’Alsace, sparkling wines made in the Méthode Traditionelle, are vinified in the same way as Champagne, but utilize the grapes varieties of Alsace in addition to those traditionally used for making champagne. The most popular styles are Brut, usually made with local white grapes but can also include Chardonnay; and Brut Rosé, which can only be made with Pinot Noir.

“Alsace’s dry climate and cool evenings during the growing season create the perfect combination for giving our grapes the acidity needed to make excellent sparkling wines,” said Jacques of his family’s Crémant d’Alsace. “And not having to rely exclusively on Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, two of the industry’s most expensive grape varieties, allows us to make wines of individuality and also keep costs in check, which in turn allows us to provide wines of great value for the price.”

With most Crémant d’Alsace wines priced at under $25, it’s a win-win in our opinion, and helps make Crémant d’Alsace Brut and Rosé some of France’s best sparkling wines.

Cattin wines we tasted; all available in the U.S.A.  Imported by T. Edwards Wines.

Cattin wines

Riesling AOC Alsace 2018, SRP: $17. Appearance: bright and pale yellow with green reflections. Nose: mineral with citrus flowers. Palate: fresh, dry and mineral, with grapefruit flavors. Pairings: sushi, choucroute, goat cheese.

Gewurztraminer AOC Alsace 2017, SRP: $18. Appearance: clear, pale gold. Nose: perfumed nose with lychee and mango aromas and a delicate touch of rose water. Palate: ripe exotic fruits with floral notes; well-balanced between spiciness and freshness; a long-lasting finish. Pairings: curries, chicken or vegetable chili, strong cheeses (e.g., real Munster cheese from Alsace).

AOC Crémant d’Alsace Brut, SRP: $22. Appearance: bright pale gold; fine bubbles. Nose: fresh; green apple and white flowers. Palate: fresh and dry palate; lively acidity balanced with fruitiness of green apple and lemon; fine and creamy bubbles. Pairings: apertif, fish, white meats.

AOC Crémant d’Alsace Rosé, SRP: $20. Appearance: clear; elegant salmon pink; abundant and dynamic bubbles. Nose: fruity especially red fruits such as cherry and black currants. Palate: refreshing and creamy with fruity aromas such as strawberries and lemon. A clean and long lasting finish. Pairings: spicy Asian  dishes, fruit desserts.

If you visit Cattin Winery, try the wine and cheese pairing. We learned Jacques Cattin is a cheese enthusiast who studied cheesemaking.

Listen to The Connected Table Sips with Jacques and Anaïs Sirop Cattin